Philosopher Fridays: Russell

If I hadn’t been sick for the last couple of days with a head filled with mush, I would have called your attention to Michelle Joelle’s outstanding post on Neil deGrasse Tyson and philosophy. She made many excellent points that I failed to mention. Well, better late than never. Michelle has done a follow up looking at one of those questions Tyson may feel is not worth looking at, and pointing out why it is. I’ve rarely read anything by Bertrand Russell where I didn’t feel at least a little bit wiser afterward.

Stories & Soliloquies

Philosopher Fridays is back this week. This series is not designed to give anything close to a comprehensive view on any philosopher in particular, but to explore what I find most interesting about different philosophical figures. I tend to focus on narrative, myth, metaphysics, and epistemology. This week, I’ll be continuing where I left off on Wednesday in my post on Neil DeGrasse Tyson’s controversial remarks on philosophy, as well as in the comments section of SelfAwarePatterns’ excellent post on the topic.

RUSSELL:Bertrand Russell (1872-1970) was a British philosopher who you’ll also find listed as a political activist, a mathematician, an historian, and several other things. But what he’s most famous for is his role in founding what we now call “analytic philosophy”, the primary style of philosophy done in anglophone countries and which prioritizes developing logical clarity in discrete problems and arguments.

Russell’s The Problems of Philosophy is one of my…

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