What do you use to keep track of the blogs and sites that you follow?

English: This icon, known as the "feed ic...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I’m a big user of RSS feeds, and used to pretty much live in Google Reader before Google killed it.  In the months after GR was shut down, I tried a number of different RSS reading services including Feedly, AOL, Digg, and many others including client based products.  I settled fairly early on Feedly, although it had a number of arbitrary and pointless limitations that drove me crazy.

At some point, I discovered InoReader and fell in love with it.  It has a wealth of options and seems able to read many marginally functional feeds.  However, it’s mobile interface has never been very good, and lately it seems like it’s been slower and more prone to outages.  So, I’m trying Feedly again.

Feedly has gotten a lot better, most notably in its performance which I now find to be outstanding.  However, it continues to have a number of limitations and rigid user interface functionality that I find frustrating.  One is its insistence at putting feeds with no unread items at the bottom of the feed list, and forcing me to periodically do a browser refresh to see if any new items have come out in those feeds.  Another is the inability to change the low contrast font colors.

That said,  I think I could live with Feedly for a while, but I’m wondering, if you’re an RSS user, what are you using these days?  If you don’t use RSS, what do you use to keep track of the blogs and sites that you follow?  Social media like Twitter or Facebook?  Internet bookmarks?  Just wondering.  (I’m sure many WordPress bloggers use the WordPress reader, and I do too for many WordPress sites, but not for other sites throughout the web.)

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18 Responses to What do you use to keep track of the blogs and sites that you follow?

  1. I use wordpress for post of my reading, and bloglovin for others. It does have a women’s magazine feel to it, but I like the mobile interface.

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  2. Brett says:

    I use Feedly, too. I’m actually growing more fond of it than I was of Google Reader.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Steve Morris says:

    I use your blog, so make sure you don’t miss anything interesting!

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  4. I just randomly hit up the blogs that I like from time to time. For Scientia Salon, where I’m pretty heavily involved in debates from time to time I sometimes keep a tab open on the raw XML RSS feed for comments and refresh it obsessively.

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  5. Ignostic Atheist says:

    I’ve been using feedly since google announced they were going to dump us. It hits the spot.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I just have the sites I care about send me email notifications 🙂

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  7. James Pailly says:

    I use Feedly. I can’t say I love it, but it’s the best of the things I’ve tried.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. s7hummel says:

    Michelle. so we have an important question which is actually very simple (but its essence can also be the basis of our development as a human species)… MUSIC… whether it is an important element supporting the creative process… also great support less absorbing activities like reading my stupid posts, and the answer to this… so if this is something that is PRETTY important or just element forming a colorless background, totally irrelevant…?

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    • I think music definitely supports the creative process, but for me, music *is* a creative process. I dance, sing, and play a few instruments, and growing up I did a little bit of musical theatre and cheerleading (I miss them both!). My current favorite forms of musical expression are choral singing and partner dancing, and through them I feel like I can access something greater than myself, so they take all of me (and don’t just support other endeavors).

      I sometimes like to listen to music while I write and read, though, which is what I assume you’re asking about, but I have to choose carefully. I made the mistake of listening to the LotR soundtrack while reading about nuclear weapons treaties for a Foreign Policy class once, and the combo gave me all sorts of feeling of epic doom. I don’t recommend it!

      So tldr;: I think it’s extremely important, and that what you listen to while you read and write actively affects how to think and create images in your head.

      Liked by 2 people

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